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Event Details

Drinks & Dialogue w/ Rodney Hopson: What it means to re-historicize evaluation and the Nobody Knows My Name Evaluation Project

  • Thu, April 06, 2017
  • 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
  • Ten Tigers Parlour (3813 Georgia Avenue NW, Washington)

Registration


Registration is closed

Join Washington Evaluators (WE) for an evening of drinks and dialogue with Rodney Hopson, WE member and former President of the American Evaluation Association (AEA). 

Drinks & Dialogue: What it means to re-historicize evaluation and the Nobody Knows My Name Evaluation Project

Rodney will be discussing the Nobody Knows My Name Project, which uncovers the untold contributions of African American educational researchers and evaluators in the United States during the pre-Brown v. Board era. 

This event will be hosted at Ten Tigers Parlour, in DC's Petworth neighborhood, from 6-8pm on Thursday, April 6, 2017. Please join at 6pm to meet WE members and grab a drink (on you) in advance of the discussion (on us), which will start at 6:30pm. 

Ten Tiger Parlour Logo

What: Drinks & Dialogue w/ Rodney Hopson
Where: Ten Tigers Parlour (Map: 3813 Georgia Avenue NW, Washington)
When: Thursday, April 6, 2016 from 6-8pm
Nearest metro: Georgia Ave. / Petworth metro (yellow-green lines)
Registration: Please register in advance for this pay-as-you-go event; space is limited.

Rodney Hopson, Ph.D. is Professor, Division of Educational Psychology, Research Methods, and Education Policy, College of Education and Human Development and Senior Research Fellow, Center for Education Policy and Evaluation, George Mason University. Hopson currently serves as an affiliated faculty member of the Center for Culturally Responsive Assessment and Evaluation (CREA) at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. His primary research areas lie in comparative and international education policy and politics with a focus on official, indigenous, and medium of instruction language issues; critical democratic, and cultural issues in education and social policy and evaluation; neighborhoods and education policy; and interpretive, qualitative and ethnographic methods.

(c) 2017 Washington Evaluators

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